10 things the Hansons Marathon Method has taught me

After 14 weeks of mostly following the Hansons Marathon Method training for the London Marathon, I thought I’d share a few important lessons it’s taught me so far, that I can definitely take into the marathon I’m planning next year- a sunny jaunt to Barcelona!

  1. If you’re going to run more a la Hansons, you really do need to slow right down. There’s a world of difference, if you’re going to run up to 50 miles a week, between a 9 minute mile and a 10 minute mile, even if they don’t feel that much different in terms of effort, and you need to do the easy miles truly easy to reap the rewards.Hansons
  2. In the same vein, recovery runs should feel almost comically slow, like an exaggerated version of slow running. Only that way, do your legs feel better at the end than they did at the start. World record holding marathoners racing at sub-5 minute miles will do recovery runs at 8 minute miles, so if they slow down that much there’s probably a lesson in there for all of us to put our ego to one side and go for a granny jog.
  3. Spreading mileage more consistently through the week really works, as opposed to some traditional plans that have you running 20 of your weekly 35 miles on a Sunday. Spread the miles, spread the injury risk, and trust me, you still get used to running on very tired legs!Hansons
  4. You don’t have to follow a plan to the letter to use its training methods. I learned very quickly that the best way for me to recover is to skip the Monday recovery run that Hansons schedule in, and use the evening for a really good stretching and foam roller session. Just because a session is on the plan, it doesn’t necessarily mean it’s what your legs need that day!
  5. The little things for recovery that you can do really add up when you’re clocking up pretty big mileage. Stretching, massage, getting plenty of sleep, eating enough carbs before/during training and plenty of protein after- all boring, and nothing groundbreaking, but they really do add up, and when I look in my training diary at the weeks that I haven’t run well, I can ALWAYS trace it back to slacking off the little things, being super busy at work or overdoing things. My personal favourite new recovery boost is after a tough session in the evening, instead of dessert, I make a proper hot chocolate with full-fat milk just before bed to top me up with goodness overnight. Yummy and good for sleep!Hansons
  6. Speedwork for a marathon doesn’t have to mean absolutely smashing yourself so you can’t walk the next day. Each session should stretch you a little, and the progress comes from being fit to do them, at a consistent pace, week in week out- not nailing them once and being unable to move the rest of the week!
  7. Sundays don’t have to mean massive long runs of 20 miles or more that ruin me for the day any more. A strongly paced 16 miles is more than enough training benefit, and actually, is a far bigger confidence boost than dragging myself round a terrible 22 miles!
  8. The best confidence boost for trying to race a marathon PB, it turns out, is getting out and running the miles at marathon pace. A 12 mile run with 10 at race pace on a weekday might feel like an overhead, but that time teaching your legs to tick over at a set pace is really, really confidence boosting!
  9. Strava is not everything. If you’re going to train the Hansons way, you really have to let go of segment chasing. Though you do top the distance leaderboards without too much hassle 😉
  10. And to end  on a lighthearted note, Hansons has taught me that if you buy nice enough kit (I’m looking at you, Lululemon), it doesn’t need washing after every run. You generate enough laundry on this plan without fresh kit for every run!

If you’ve trained the Hansons way, what did it teach you? And if you haven’t, would you consider it?

7 thoughts on “10 things the Hansons Marathon Method has taught me

  1. Keith Gallagher

    Love Hansens training. Done a few different trainings and Hansens Is the only one that delivered and I was able to reach my goals. Trained and followed the plan to a “T” to run a 3:05 and I BQ’d with a 3:03:28. (Previous PR – 3:17) . Thank God and Hansens!

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  2. Laureen

    Interesting! I like running 3 times a week only but I am alway open to knew suggestions.
    And I agree with you, making the plan work for you rather than the other way round is key

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  3. Cathy Robertson

    Thanks for this; it really is so interesting – and useful – to read how these training plans actually work in practice. I’m not training for a marathon, but the general principles seem relevant to training for any distance (up to 20 miles, in my case).

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